Separation of Concerns

So it seems like the theme for this year's holiday dev discussion (more like holiday nerd wars) is the recurring idea of separation of concerns. The community is divided into two camps: The camp that believes in separation by language and the other is the camp that believes in separation of responsibility. So here's my opinion on a few things.

Separation of Concerns Components Libraries Templating Frameworks

How You Write CSS Might Be Breaking WYSIWYG Content

Whenever we work with content that comes from WYSIWYG editors, there's always feedback from QA about the styling not being quite right. Every time this is brought up, it's just dismissed as a WYSIWYG issue, that the nature of the content is just unpredictable during development. That's just a convenient excuse, and here's why.

CSS WYSIWYG

When I Review Code...

I am behind on my writing. Got busy in the last few weeks being in a shuffle of projects. Different challenges, different environments, different tech stacks, my kind of fun. And if there is one thing I like about it this time, we now officially incorporate code reviews in our workflow.

code review maintainability

High Reuse Web Interfaces

HTML and CSS maintainability, scalability and reusability is often taken for granted. Just because HTML Just Works™ and we can just pop in a CSS framework that Just Works™ doesn't mean it doesn't require the same amount of attention as your JS architecture, your PHP code quality or your awesome Java code. In most cases, it's actually HTML and CSS spaghetti that will slow you down. Here's how you can cut down development time by keeping these 5 little steps in mind when building web interfaces.

HTML CSS BEM reusability scalability maintainability

Your Concept Of CSS Is Broken

A few weeks ago, I talked to the team about BEM, a simple naming convention that brings sense and structure to CSS. It was brought up because CSS doesn't get the same attention like the other tech used in the company. Its impact to delivery is often seen as negligible, dismissing it as just another bug in need of a fix. But unknown to everyone, it's dragging everyone back. As always, I get mixed reactions from the developers. Some find it fascinating, some find it silly, and others be like "meh". Here were some questions that were thrown in.

CSS Scalability

© Joseph Descalzota